Granuloma Annulare ICD 9 Code

Granuloma Annulare ICD 9 Code

3727

Billable Medical Code for Other Specified Erythematous Conditions

Diagnosis Code for Reimbursement Claim: ICD-9-CM 695.89

Code will be replaced by October 2015 and relabeled as ICD-10-CM 695.89.

Known As

Granuloma annulare is also known as acute erythema, acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis, danthron erythema, dermatopathic lymphadenitis, desquamation of skin following febrile illness, desquamation secondary to acute systemic illness, drug-induced desquamation of skin, epidermal collarette, erythema elevatum diutinum, erythema fugax, erythema marginatum in acute rheumatic fever, erythema scarlatiniforme, erythematous ear canal, erythematous mucosa, excessive smegma, exfoliative dermatitis generalized, generalized exfoliative dermatitis, generalized granuloma annulare, genitocrural intertrigo, granuloma annulare, granuloma gluteale infantum, increased desquamation, infantile erythroderma failure to thrive and diarrhea syndrome, intertrigo, intertrigo (inflammation in body folds), intertrigo of abdominal skin fold, keratolytic winter erythema, linear granuloma annulare, liver palms, localized desquamation, localized granuloma annulare, micropapular weal, necrolytic migratory erythema, peeling of skin, perforating granuloma annulare, pityriasis rubra, staphylococcal intertrigo, streptococcal intertrigo, subcutaneous granuloma annulare, submammary intertrigo, sweet’s disease due to drug, sweet’s disease following infection, and sweets syndrome. This excludes mycotic intertrigo (111.0-111.9). This applies to erythema intertrigo, intertrigo, and pityriasis rubra (hebra).

Granuloma Annulare Definition and Symptoms

Granuloma annulare is a skin condition that causes raised bumps, which can be red or skin colored, on the skin that form in a ring patter. This typically affects the hands and feet. The cause is unknown but may be triggered in some people by minor skin injuries. Symptoms are very few, usually just the bumps themselves, but the rash may be painful or itchy in severe cases.